A Touch of Fiction: “Coffee, Black”

Man at a Café Table, Paris, 1911, Umberto Boccioni, Italian, Reggio 1882–1916 Sorte.Ink on paper, 8 1/8” x 5 3/8,” drawing. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Man at a Café Table, Paris, 1911, Umberto Boccioni, Italian, Reggio 1882–1916 Sorte.Ink on paper, 8 1/8” x 5 3/8,” drawing. Photo courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

 

Sudden or “flash” fiction: a fictional work of extreme brevity, also known as a “micro-story,” that is typically a few hundred words in length but still offers character and plot development.


 

“Coffee, Black”

a work of sudden fiction

by C.A. Meyer

We met at the campus coffee shop reserved primarily for hipster students; chalk signatures and slogans marked up the walls and vintage posters clambered for attention above second-hand couches and lounge chairs, single lightbulbs dangling from chains above a cluster of desks in the corner. He liked to claim the same set of wrought iron chairs and matching table for us on the back porch, where the chain-smoking grad students could park themselves around a brick furnace, unused since Houston rarely has a need for them, aside from cozy aesthetics. Our view was of the freeway entry and exit off campus, and we often had to repeat ourselves in conversation, competing with the sputtering whir of incoming trucks.

I’d always find him with his mug of black coffee cooling on the table, eyes in a book he was only half reading, one calf folded over his thigh, foot tapping the air like a jackrabbit. He’d look up as soon as I pushed open the glass door to the porch, pulling back on a smile that would quickly get away from him the closer I neared. He’d take a sip from his mug to hide it, nodding hello.

“You’re late.”


WritingAlex Meyer2 Comments